Blessed Fury — a review

C. S.  Wilde’s Blessed Fury is a good start to a new series.  It’s packed with action, some minor amount of mystery, and some pretty good looks at good and evil.  I enjoyed the take on demons and angels, especially the emphasis that demons are not all bad and angels are not all good.  The integration of werewolves and vampires into the hierarchy was well-done, as well.  Wilde does a pretty good job of making sure the mythology of her world is complete.

I loved that the characters had complex backstories that come out throughout the book.  Liam is a good foil for Ava.  And the theme of his darkness to her light shines throughout the story.  I did kind of have an issue with Ava.  She’s too…bland.  Ava just sort of fades into the background.  Even when she’s this uber-impressive super being, she’s still kind of blah.  Which means you’re pretty deep into the book before she even does something remotely interesting.  Mostly, she seems to hover around Liam spouting platitudes and ‘feel good’ emotions in an attempt to defuse him.  It’s…pretty annoying.  I enjoy a vulnerable and sweet FMC, every now and then…but a vulnerable and sweet FMC who can fight like a warrior and seems to have an on/off switch to access that?  I get lost in the dual personalities.

Have I mentioned before that I generally HATE love triangles?  All the angst about “which one should I choose?” drives me up the wall.  And this series starts out with a doozy of a love triangle.  It was also pretty obvious what was going to happen…which was disappointing.  The angst wasn’t even deep enough to camouflage the final outcome.  It made the love triangle feel forced…because it was obvious from the beginning who she loved and who she’d choose.

Overall, this book was okay.  It took me about 4 tries to get into it, but once I pushed my way through the beginning, it flowed well.  It justc and I’m not sure I want to continue because of that.  Probably 3 stars.  This wasn’t fantastic, but it didn’t crash and burn, either.  It was just kind of an unmemorable rewriting of religious mythos in an urban setting.

If you want to check it out, grab a copy by clicking the image below!

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